Mosaic Mosaic Gazing Ball


Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Gold
$46.89
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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Gold

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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Blue
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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Blue

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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Rainbow
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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Rainbow

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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Green
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Sunnydaze Mosaic Glass Gazing Globe Ball 10 Inch Green

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Flower Petal Mosaic Gazing Ball
£37.99

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Flower Petal Mosaic Gazing Ball by Gifted Living

  • Glass
  • Elegantly designed. Perfect for your garden.
  • Great for yourself or as a gift!

Gold Mosaic Gazing Ball
£39.99

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Gold Mosaic Gazing Ball by Gifted Living

  • Great for yourself or as a gift
  • 10" round
  • Glass

2 x Glass Ball Green Mosaic Glass Ball Garden Ball Rose Ball Diameter 18 cm
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2 x Glass Ball Green Mosaic Glass Ball Garden Ball Rose Ball Diameter 18 cm by Geschenkestadl

  • Colour: Green (Green)
  • Card size approx diameter 18 cm
  • Material: Glass

Alpine Corporation Mosaic Silver Gazing Ball
£42.29
Alpine Corporation Mosaic Silver Gazing Ball by Alpine

  • Perfect for outdoor settings
  • Mosaic tiling
  • Mirror finish

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Mosaic artists play with balls T-Shirt

Butterfly mosaic gazing ball

Gazing globes are making a comeback - News & Observer

Did I see a glint of mocking laughter in a friend's eyes when I mentioned the new addition to my garden - a gazing globe. These mirrored glass ornaments were popular until about 50 years ago. They're now making a comeback, straddling the fence between attractive ornament and - to some people - kitsch. Gazing globes date back to 13th-century Italy, a country known for garden ornaments, and, more specifically, to Venice, a city known for glassworks. They once were more than mere ornaments. They also were put in place to bring happiness, ward off evil spirits and attract fairies. In Victorian times, a globe near a gate allowed you to look around the corner to see who or what was approaching from the other side of the fence or hedge. The globes also found their way indoors. A butler could look around a corner to check if anyone was pocketing cutlery. A father could maintain a watchful eye on his daughter and her beau. Look at a gazing globe and you'll have a fish-eye view of everything except what's directly behind the globe. As you move, the reflection also moves, except that you, the viewer, are always staring directly back at yourself. You are always the center of this perceptual universe - a metaphor, perhaps, for existence. In my garden, however, the globe isn't a protector or metaphor. it's just an ornament. In summer, it peeked out from among low shrubs and flowers. Over the past few months, the globe has increasingly come into focus. It stands out most boldly in the garden on those winter days when it's surrounded by billowing white snow. Today's gazing globes have evolved from those orbs of past decades that often stood alone on pedestals in the center of lawns. In various sizes and tints, today's globes nestle into flower beds, hang from branches or float in ponds. Rather than having a smooth, mirrored surface, they might be mosaics of silvered and colored glass. Some gardeners make their own by gluing shards of mirrors or tile onto old bowling balls. To avoid the fragility of traditional gazing globes, some are now made from shiny stainless steel. I remember gazing globes from my youth, and nostalgia figures into my liking for them. I also remember being a little nervous around them, and I still like the glass ones. They're not that fragile, though. more than once, strong winds have knocked my globe off its pedestal and each time the globe, thankfully, made a soft enough. Source: www.newsobserver.com

Repurposed items are a great fit for gardens - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Not surprisingly, many of the creators of the distinctive pieces found at Samara Garden & Home in Milwaukee take their inspiration from nature and a concern for the planet. For example, Christine Milad of Whitefish Bay clearly ascribes to the philosophy that "it's what's inside that counts" when creating gazing balls under the name Ophelia's Orbs. The orbs are also available at the Flying Pig in Algoma. What's inside those orbs are old bowling balls that would otherwise end up in landfills. On the outside is a waterproof epoxy that Milad uses to affix bits of glass in a decorative arrangement. Milad, a retired physical education teacher, likes to joke, "This is the most success I've ever had with a bowling ball. She recommends displaying the orbs on pedestals or flowerpots, and adds that her favorite base is a terra cotta birdbath stand that can be found at Stein Garden & Gifts for about $20. A similar concern for items destined for the landfill inspires... After retiring as a journalist and instructor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, she started working part time for an estate sale company. Magowan says she was bothered to see "many odds and ends and cracked and broken items that would end up in the trash if no use were found for them. So being an avid gardener, I decided to use some of them to decorate flowerpots and birdhouses — sort of eclectic mosaics, I guess. "Quite often I use a theme such as flowers, animals or people for each pot," she adds. Cheryl Schwark, who makes birdbaths and birdfeeders using concrete castings of leaves, has found a new appreciation for another unwanted item: burdock. Leaves with deep veining, including rhubarb and hosta, work especially well for her castings. She recalls that when she first moved to the Town of Raymond in Racine County, she considered the burdock she found growing in her yard a nuisance weed. But through her art, she saw its potential. "So that burdock is so precious to me," Schwark says. Source: www.jsonline.com

So Many New Hops - Craft Beer & Brewing

Breeding new hops varieties is a time-consuming process, and a typical year might see a few varieties (at most) reach commercial markets. But 2014 was a bumper year for the bitter flower, with no fewer than thirteen new hops varieties making their debut at the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference. Gene Probasco, who started the first private hops-breeding program in the United States at John I. Haas in Washington’s Yakima Valley, learned something long ago that speaks to the challenge brewers face today when evaluating a widening range of... As part of a project for a brewery client that began in 1990, Probasco created about 150 potential cultivars, and the client produced single-hopped beers with each of them. He tasted more than 100. “It was a real eye opener. Some of the beers were just bad,” says Probasco, who is in charge of farm and agronomic services as well as breeding at Haas. “Some of them were very, very good. Some varieties had a nice smell, but they made bad-tasting beer. There weren’t many that smelled bad, but some of those made good beer. When private and public breeding programs combined to release one or two new varieties a year, it was relatively easy for brewers to get to know them. “You actually have to brew with hops to figure them out,” says Vinnie Cilurzo at Santa Rosa, California’s Russian River Brewing Company. Making batches of beer with a single hop “rarely yields a beer that could be an actual ongoing recipe, but it does teach you which components of the hop work and which do not work. Crystal Ball Gazing However, in just the past year, more than a dozen distinctly different newcomers have emerged. Last April, vendors at the Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, Colorado, poured beers showcasing many of the varieties to give brewers an idea of what they taste like in beer. An alternative is to find beers brewed by early adopters, sampling them while thinking about what flavors might be a result of those hops and what other beers they could work in. Until the past decade, when brewers talked about desirable aroma... ” Favored hops usually had relatively low amounts of essential oils. Now brewers clamor for hops rich in oil and varieties that smell of melon, pineapple, coconut, white pepper, peaches, peppermint, lychee,. Source: beerandbrewing.com

Latest News

  • Gazing globes are making a comeback

    01/24/15 ,via News & Observer

    Did I see a glint of mocking laughter in a friend's eyes when I mentioned the new addition to my garden - a gazing globe? These mirrored glass ornaments were popular until about 50 years ago. They're now making a comeback, straddling the fence between 

  • Repurposed items are a great fit for gardens

    For example, Christine Milad of Whitefish Bay clearly ascribes to the philosophy that "it's what's inside that counts" when creating gazing balls under the name Ophelia's Orbs. The orbs are also available at the Flying Pig in Algoma. What's inside

  • So Many New Hops

    02/18/15 ,via Craft Beer & Brewing

    He particularly likes its fresh orange notes, which stand out in a blend that also includes several New Zealand hops and Mosaic. “Because it's German, that makes it different,” he says. When Brynildson smelled Hallertau Blanc, he immediately thought

  • Garden Walk a trail of inspiration for a good cause

    06/12/15 ,via Great Falls Tribune

    There are also raffle tickets available for $5 apiece for prizes such as "The Growing Chair," which is a little wooden chair planter, a mosaic gazing ball for the garden, and a planter filled with herbs to expand your culinary horizons. Tickets can be

  • Gazing globes making a comeback

    01/08/15 ,via The Providence Journal

    Rather than having a smooth, mirrored surface, today's gazing globe might be a mosaic of silvered and colored glass. Some gardeners make their own by gluing shards of mirrors or tile onto old bowling balls. To avoid the fragility of traditional gazing

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  • Is there a gazing globe in your garden's future?

    01/08/15 ,via Daily Herald

    Rather than having a smooth, mirrored surface, today's gazing globe might be a mosaic of silvered and colored glass. Some gardeners make their own by gluing shards of mirrors or tile onto old bowling balls. To avoid the fragility of traditional gazing ...

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MOSAIC GAZING BALL | Mosaic Gazing Balls | Pinterest

MOSAIC GAZING BALL | Mosaic Gazing Balls | Pinterest
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Home > Outdoor Decor > Gazing Globes > 10" Mosaic Gazing Ball - Purple

Home > Outdoor Decor > Gazing Globes > 10" Mosaic Gazing Ball - Purple

Mosaic gazing ball garden yard lawn glass decor outdoor globe decorat ...

Mosaic gazing ball garden yard lawn glass decor outdoor globe decorat ...
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